Officials review county insolvency list

Published 12:00pm Tuesday, October 8, 2013

In a two and a half hour meeting, the Lincoln County Board of Supervisors knocked off multiple agenda items Monday morning at the Brookhaven-Lincoln County Government Complex.

Lincoln County tax assessor and collector Rita Goss provided the board information about uncollected taxes for the 2012-2013 fiscal year, as well as unpaid personal property taxes. This makes up part of the insolvency list that the board reviewed, which consists of bad checks and personal property that have gone unpaid for the year, among other things.

Lincoln County Historical and Genealogical Board President Rita Rich, notified board members about the dedication of a historical marker for the former Jewish temple at the Lincoln County Historical and Genealogical Society museum. The dedication will take place Tuesday, Oct. 9, at 10 a.m.

The board also agreed to a proposal by Waste Pro to increase its rates by 1.46 percent, something that “is not uncommon,” according to Chancery Clerk Tillmon Bishop. Funds are already allocated towards this expense, and at a higher rate than Waste Pro currently charges, said Bishop. “This will eat into the pot we already have,” said Bishop.

In other business, the board approved the appointment of Roland Ross to the Co-Lin Community College Board of Trustees. Ross will serve on a three-year term on the board from Jan. 1, 2014, to Dec. 31 of 2017.

The board made note of the 15-year celebration of Reeds Metals on Friday, Oct. 18, and approved the salary adjustment of victim assistance coordinator, Jamie Murrell.

The board also purchased a metal building, previously intended to be used by the volunteer fire department in Bogue Chitto, and approved interstate lighting, along with Christmas parade funds.

The board granted a petition to have “Leggett Martin Lane” made public.

Additionally, County engineer Ryan Holmes updated the board on projects currently under way in the county.

Holmes provided board members a list of bridges that are in need of repair in the county, and their structural rating, which is determined by a number of factors including traffic volume. In the case of bridge repair, even after repairs are made, ratings don’t necessarily improve, as explained by Holmes. “Some bridges that we repair are merely given enough maintenance to maintain their current rating, such as replacing timber on a bridge.”

Another road striping project is under way, according to Holmes. “We are looking at striping close to 70 miles of road. We also plan on putting up new signs.”

Holmes told the board that he would have a list of all the roads his department plans to stripe at the next board meeting.