DAILY LEADER / KATIE WILLIAMSON / Terry Vanderventer,  also known as "The Snake Man," shows a group of children one of the reptiles during a visit to the Lincoln-Lawrence-Franklin Regional Library last week.
DAILY LEADER / KATIE WILLIAMSON / Terry Vanderventer, also known as "The Snake Man," shows a group of children one of the reptiles during a visit to the Lincoln-Lawrence-Franklin Regional Library last week.

Snakes Alive! : Kids get to visit with live reptiles at the library

Published 10:15am Wednesday, July 23, 2014

The Snake Man unleashed his collection of live reptiles in front of a packed roomful of children at the Lincoln-Lawrence-Franklin Regional Library Thursday.

Terry Vandeventer, also known as The Snake Man, travels around to libraries, schools, museums, professional events, birthdays and organizations around the world to educate people about snakes. He is the owner of The Living Reptile Museum Educational Productions and is recognized around the world as a leading expert on snakes.

Vanderventer said people should not be afraid of snakes or try to kill them because they are helpful in the natural environment. He added that only a very small percentage of them are poisonous, so people should treat them with respect.

Bryce Estes, 7,  gets a chance to hold one of the snakes. Vanderveneter, who spoke to the children at the library Thursday, works with the Mississippi Museum of Natural Science. He began studying snakes at a young age and has numerous scientific and popular publications and has been in charge of the Jackson Zoo Reptile Department.
Bryce Estes, 7, gets a chance to hold one of the snakes. Vanderveneter, who spoke to the children at the library Thursday, works with the Mississippi Museum of Natural Science. He began studying snakes at a young age and has numerous scientific and popular publications and has been in charge of the Jackson Zoo Reptile Department.

The children at the library offered rapt attention as Vanderventer pulled out several different live snakes. He discussed the snakes’ habitats, usefulness and histories.

Vanderveneter has been presenting lectures such as this for more than 30 years. He began studying snakes at a young age and has numerous scientific and popular publications and has been in charge of the Jackson Zoo Reptile Department. Now, he works with the Mississippi Museum of Natural Science as a herpetology field associate.

The Snake Man urged the children to not be scared of the reptiles, but to be respectful. He said if you come across a snake, you should take two steps back and walk away. He hopes to clear up the bad reputation the reptiles have.

For more information about Vanderventer and his scaly friends, visit www.livingreptilemuseum.com or call him at 601-371-7414.