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BARL dogs find homes across country

DAILY LEADER / JOSH TILTON / Rudolph, a Chow Chow Spaniel, tugs on a shoelace. He is one of three puppies recently dropped off at BARL.

DAILY LEADER / JOSH TILTON / Rudolph, a Chow Chow Spaniel, tugs on a shoelace. He is one of three puppies recently dropped off at BARL.

The Brookhaven Animal Rescue League works to give abandoned animals a new home and now have been outsourcing their guests to programs that deliver adopted animals to homes nationwide.

One such program is Southern Pines, which relocates dogs mainly to locations in Florida. BARL began working with the organization this summer.

The mission statement according listed on their website is, “To provide humane shelter for homeless and lost cats and dogs, provide affordable spay/neuter and healthy pet services, encourage adoptions, and educate the community about responsible pet ownership.”

Based in Hattiesburg, Southern Pines’ animals can be viewed and adopted at southernpinesanimalshelter.org.

Rusty Adcock is a volunteer on the board of directors at BARL and understands how large a contribution their combined effort is making.

DAILY LEADER / JOSH TILTON / Carrot Top, a Husky mix, avoids looking directly at the camera.

DAILY LEADER / JOSH TILTON / Carrot Top, a Husky mix, avoids looking directly at the camera.

“All these 501c3 organizations are having to go out for grant money, and a lot of grant money is geared toward having collaborative efforts between bigger organizations and smaller organizations. It turned out to be beneficial for both of us.”

501c3 categorizes organizations that are non-profit and tax-exempt.

Since last year, BARL has also been working alongside Homeward Bound, an organization run through Mississippi State students and faculty. Homeward Bound is a conduit for moving homeless animals from the South into Northeastern homes.

When transporting animals of any kind, the method of transportation is always a matter of concern.

“[Southern Pines] had a 15-person van that they use to transport the dogs,” Adcock recalled.

According to the board member, Homeward bound transported their animals in an air-conditioned dog kennel placed in the back of a large church van.

Since they were conceived, the partnerships have sent over 100 Lincoln County dogs to homes across the nation, and BARL does not plan on slowing down anytime soon. Since the kennel has limited space, the more dogs adopted allow for more dogs to be sheltered, ultimately furthering the mission of BARL.