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Group works on history book

Photo Courtesy of the Lincoln, Lawrence, Franklin Regional Library / Nurse Josephine “Josie” Eitel Gilliam (right) rides in a horse and buggy with a local doctor. Gilliam’s (1878-1969) career is first noted as one of three incorporators - E. L. Summers, Josephine A. Eitel and S. G. Wilson - of The Wilson Infirmary Training School for Nurses. The original purpose of the Domestic Business Corporation was to offer a mill hospital for the employees of the Pearl River Lumber Company, located in the village of Pearlhaven, which later became part of Brookhaven. The last filing date for the corporation was Nov. 20, 1908. Soon after, Dr. Wilson moved to New Orleans. Gilliam’s work is documented in an article she wrote describing the excellent work of the Red Cross Nurses after the storm in Purvis on April 24, in the American Journal of Nursing, October 1908. Eitel proudly proclaims she was one of the nurses on assignment. She later married Eugene Lewellyn Gilliam and is buried in Bogue Chitto in Lincoln County.

Photo Courtesy of the Lincoln, Lawrence, Franklin Regional Library / Nurse Josephine “Josie” Eitel Gilliam (right) rides in a horse and buggy with a local doctor. Gilliam’s (1878-1969) career is first noted as one of three incorporators – E. L. Summers, Josephine A. Eitel and S. G. Wilson – of The Wilson Infirmary Training School for Nurses. The original purpose of the Domestic Business Corporation was to offer a mill hospital for the employees of the Pearl River Lumber Company, located in the village of Pearlhaven, which later became part of Brookhaven. The last filing date for the corporation was Nov. 20, 1908. Soon after, Dr. Wilson moved to New Orleans. Gilliam’s work is documented in an article she wrote describing the excellent work of the Red Cross Nurses after the storm in Purvis on April 24, in the American Journal of Nursing, October 1908. Eitel proudly proclaims she was one of the nurses on assignment. She later married Eugene Lewellyn Gilliam and is buried in Bogue Chitto in Lincoln County.

A group of women are working to compile photos illustrating the history of Lincoln County, and they are asking for help from anyone who may have photos dating before 1960.

Tammie Brewer, Bettie Bullard, Sue Dorman and Marti Parker, all members of the Lincoln County Historical and Genealogical Society, have a publishing deal with Arcadia Publishing to help preserve the history of the area. Sue Dorman said the publisher contacted her, and the group quickly jumped on the opportunity.

Arcadia Publishing publishes pictorial history books and produced a similar book for Copiah County in 2007. Brewer, Bullard, Dorman and Parker are collecting the information that will be printed in Lincoln County’s book. In an effort to reach out to all Lincoln County residents, Brewer has set up a time at the Lincoln County library to allow people to bring photos in.

“I know it’s hard for people to let go of their treasures,” Brewer said.

On Feb. 25 from 12 to 2 p.m., people will instead be able to bring the photos to Brewer. She will scan them at the library and hand them immediately back.

Unfortunately, the group will be unable to publish every picture, but they hope to find photos that have not been previously published. They are specifically looking for pictures that are agricultural related, of schools and old churches. They also are asking for pictures of people. Anyone bringing in photos must be able to identify the subjects.

Parker and Dorman said they hope to find a photo of the 1957 or 1958 Brookhaven High School football team that would include Don Estes, Lance Alworth and Ralph “Catfish” Smith. They also are looking for early settlers, such as John Calcote.

“We’re hoping to get as much information as we can,” Brewer said. “We want to tell the story of Brookhaven and how it developed through the years.”

The book will span from 1820 to 1960. It will hopefully be available for purchase by the 2015 holidays. Arcadia Publishing’s books generally costs between $20 and $25.

The group plans to put all proceeds from the book into the Lincoln County Historical Museum. The funds will either be donated directly to the museum, or the group may decide to purchase an artifact to donate to the museum. Either way, their number one goal is to preserve Lincoln County’s history.

For more information about the book or pictures, contact Brewer at 601-850-1733.