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Don’t judge coffee by its greasy book cover

Oh, my goodness, that is good.

I’m drinking Community’s Mardi Gras King Cake coffee right now. It tastes kind of like I was eating king cake and drinking coffee and accidentally got them mixed together. But not in a bad way.

It’s a simple thing, but the smell of fresh coffee brewing ­— followed by the experience of drinking a good cup of said beverage — is a relaxing thing for me. I know, it’s a very subjective experience.

You might not like some types of coffee. I didn’t care too much for the Bread Pudding flavor from Community. Once was enough, thank you.

You might not like Community Coffee. You might think some other brand is better.

Or, you might not like coffee at all. That’s OK. I used to not like it, either. But then I was converted.

And I don’t regret it.

My ability to be friends or family with someone doesn’t limit itself to coffee preferences, thankfully. My brother doesn’t drink coffee. I still claim him.

Choosing who I’ll associate with or work with, etc., based on caffeinated beverage decisions is a poor way to live life, don’t you think?

“Sorry, man, I’ve always thought of you as a brother …”

(I am your brother. Like, by birth.)

“But your recent decision to drink a store brand coffee with extra sugar and creamer has made me decide that we can no longer … sigh … be friends.”

(I’m still your brother.)

“No. Not anymore.”

I think it’s just as foolish to make those types of decisions based on someone’s financial status, social status, skin color, et cetera, et cetera.

Sure, we need to be smart about who we claim as friends, because inevitably we either influence them to be more like us or we are influenced to be more like them. And it’s easier to be pulled down than lifted up.

It’s also wrong to judge a book by its cover. Though I’ve done that, I must admit. I pick up books often because of their covers — it’s what draws my eye. I confess I’ve bought music albums for the cover alone, having heard nothing on the album. Sometimes it’s turned out positively.

Sometimes.

I thoroughly enjoyed a book entitled “Malcolm,” by George MacDonald. But the version I actually read was repackaged and retitled to appeal to a different demographic than one into which I fit. It was titled “The Fisherman’s Wife,” and bore a cover reminiscent of popular romance novels. Not what I would normally choose. But I liked the book, and carried it with me to read as I waited in doctors’ offices and drive-throughs. I didn’t care what anyone thought. I knew what was inside that gilded cover.

Have you ever eaten at one of those places that looked really sketchy from the outside? Like you prayed you wouldn’t get a disease just by touching the door handle? But for some reason you were there anyway and discovered that the food was phenomenal and the wait staff was some of the best? I have.

We have to be wise and discerning people. We can’t blindly reject things or people based on first impressions or biases or even outward appearances. Nor can we blindly accept people based on the same things.

Be smart. Think for yourself. Accept the good. Reject the bad. Follow the truth. Measure everything against a perfect standard. (As a Christ-follower, I know only one.)

Keep your eyes, heart and mind open. I’ll be over here drinking coffee, dreaming of greasy burgers and looking for my George MacDonald collection.

News editor Brett Campbell can be reached at brett.campbell@dailyleader.com or 601-265-5307.