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Donations needed for ‘Literacy in Education’ book drive

Photo submitted/Lincoln County Republican Women members Cindy Moore, Jennifer Whittier, Karen Sullivan, Patsy Yates and Becky Currie gather for a photo to commemorate their new annual book drive at the Mamie Martin Library recently.

Photo submitted/Lincoln County Republican Women members Cindy Moore, Jennifer Whittier, Karen Sullivan, Patsy Yates and Becky Currie gather for a photo to commemorate their new annual book drive at the Mamie Martin Library recently.

The deadline is fast approaching for people to donate books to a local drive held to promote early literacy.

The Lincoln County Republican Women kicked off their inaugural Karen Sullivan Literacy in Education Brook Drive.

“The Republican Women just received our charter this year,” LCRW President Cindy Moore said. “This is the first time we’ve had our book drive, but we do plan to have it in the future.”

Residents have until Oct. 26 to donate books.

Books should be aimed at readers in K-4 through third grade, Moore said. The group is asking that books be in new or gently used condition.

Donations can be dropped off at either location of Patrus Cleaners, 125 W. Monticello St. or 107 W. Court St.

Organizers will divide the donated books between Mamie Martin Elementary, Brookhaven Academy and attendance centers at Loyd Star, West Lincoln, Enterprise and Bogue Chitto.

Money donated to LCRW may also be designated for book purchases. For more information about making a financial donation, contact Jennifer Whittier or Tanza Brown at lcrwms@gmail.com.

Moore said early literacy is vitally important to a child’s success.

“The importance of early literacy cannot be overstated,” she said. “Strong reading skills form the basis for learning in all subjects and help ensure a student’s success throughout school into adulthood.”

Sullivan, alderman-at-large for Brookhaven since 2007, was chosen as the drive’s namesake because of her 20-year teaching career and her positive impact through her involvement with community projects and acquiring grants.

“I can’t think of anything I’d rather have my name attached to,” Sullivan said. “Educators are recognizing more and more than raising the literacy level begins with early childhood education.”

Sullivan said the books are a valuable tool for children to become better readers and to acquire richer vocabularies.

“I’m proud to be a part of any undertaking that puts books into the hands of young children,” Sullivan said.