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Heavenly Hog BBQ is back Saturday

A delicious tradition resurrected after more than two decades at Episcopal Church of the Redeemer in Brookhaven will make a return appearance on the church grounds Saturday.

Last year, organizers brought back the Rector’s Bar-B-Q Heavenly Hog, which originally began about 25 years ago to fund a church expansion project. With a drawdown for a cash prize and barbecue plate sales, the fundraiser appealed to the community as well as church members.

It was such a success they decided to do it again. The event will be Saturday from 11 a.m. to 1 p.m. on the church grounds. The church is located at East Monticello and North Church streets.

Brookhaven’s Episcopal Church of the Redeemer started this tradition several years ago in an effort to retire some expenses for the church’s renovation project. At that time church members wanted to do something fun for the community so everyone could have a sense of fellowship. Last year, funds were used to benefit Trinity Park. That’s the plan again this year.

Carl Craig, owner of Magnolia Blues BBQ Company, is the pit master for his second year. Mike and Austin Said as well as other members of the church will join him in cooking the “heavenly” hog.

Pulled pork plates for pick-up or lunch in the park are available for $10. Beverages and desserts will also be sold.

Drawdown tickets are $100 each and only 200 will be sold. The drawing begins that morning and the grand prize winner will be announced at 1 p.m. Cash prizes are $5,000 for first prize, $1,000 for second prize and $500 for third prize.

Shannon Clark, the event coordinator, said ticket sales have been brisk.

“The weather looks warm and sunny for Saturday,” she said. “We hope to sell tickets right up until the time for the drawing. This really is a great community event that people look forward to each spring and someone’s going to win a lot of money.”

For tickets, call 601-757-3544.

Trinity Park was completed in 2012 in an open area at the corner of East Monticello and North Jackson streets that was the site of a defunct Texaco station. The park was made possible by Bud Urban, Mike Said recalled in a story about the church’s 150th anniversary last year.

“Bud Urban was in the barbershop getting a haircut. I said to him, ‘Why don’t you just buy that lot, tear down the gas station. We’ll plant some grass. It’ll look a lot better,’” Said said. “Lo and behold, he ended up buying the thing.”

Said was quick to point out Trinity Park itself was not his idea. Urban, Dorothy Benson and a group of other women in the church joined forces to create the plan for the area.

Story by Johnny Rainer