• 79°

What do you ride and who do you ride for?

Over the years, my husband Mark would mention from time to time how he wanted to get another motorcycle. He owned one previously before I met him. I always responded, “No, you don’t need one, they are too dangerous.” Well, a few years ago he began talking about getting one more seriously. I was still not too keen on the idea at all. He then proceeded to not only talking about getting a motorcycle, but looking at used ones for sale. I had no intention of agreeing to this. One day he did find one that he really liked and wanted to go look at it. Not wanting him to travel by himself, I agreed to accompany him. Hey, a road trip also means going out to eat, right?

We made it to our destination that day and met with the owner of this motorcycle. Now remember, I went into this trip as a non-motorcycle enthusiast. However, when I saw the bike, I was in awe. It was a beautiful bike that had obviously been well taken care of. After talking with the owner (who was a retired motorcycle policeman) we felt comfortable that it had been through routine maintenance over the years. After talking with the owner for a few more minutes and looking over the bike one last time, we left and Mark was going to notify the seller of his decision to purchase or not.

On our way home, Mark and I talked and then talked some more over the next few days. This was going to be a major decision. Of course, I was still concerned with the safety aspect of it.  But, we do take a risk every time we get into a vehicle. A vehicle just feels more secure than a motorcycle and we don’t think about it as much. After weighing everything about the bike and my fears and a lot of prayer, I finally felt a sense of calmness with Mark purchasing the bike, if that’s what he decided to do. So, in a week or so, Mark became the owner of a 2006 Harley-Davidson Fat Boy.

For about six months, I watched Mark as he would leave our driveway to go riding when he got the chance. He never asked me if I wanted to go with him, but secretly I was hoping he would. Finally, one day, I mentioned to him that I might want to try riding with him, if he didn’t mind. So, we planned a day for my first ride on a motorcycle, with Mark driving of course. I enjoyed it and I was hooked from then on.

Mark had heard about the Christian Motorcyclists Association (CMA) and he went to a couple of the local chapter meetings and wanted to continue going. I went with him to some meetings also to see what it was about. The more we learned about CMA, we knew we wanted to be a part of it. Besides the Christian fellowship with others who like riding motorcycles, there was the vision of CMA. The vision of changing the world, one heart at a time started with a man named Herb Shreve.

In 1972, Mr. Herb Shreve and his son purchased their first motorcycles. In 1974, Mr. Shreve saw a need among the motorcycle world. After attending motorcycle rallies, he came in contact with motorcyclists who did not know Jesus Christ as their personal Savior. In fact, he realized that many had never heard the Gospel message. Seeing a great need for people to hear the Gospel message, Mr. Shreve began his journey to make his vision a reality with the organization of the Christian Motorcyclists Association (CMA) in 1975.

The Christian Motorcyclists Association is a worldwide ministry.  It is a non-profit, interdenominational organization. CMA ministers in a variety of ways. Members/Chapters are present at events around the world. It might be at CMA annual events such as state/national rallies or at secular events such as car shows, motorcycle rallies or benefits for someone in need. When you see a CMA tent, stop by and visit and enjoy a free cup of coffee or free water. CMA members/chapters also organize Biker Sundays at churches. That’s where anyone, CMA member or not, can meet up and ride to a particular church and join in the worship and fellowship. CMA members are also available for Bike Blessings. Whether it’s a new bike or older bike, CMA members will be glad to pray with the rider over their bike for safety and any other prayer request needs.

Not only do members of the Christian Motorcyclists Association participate in events close to home, Chapters have the opportunity to be a part of the CMA ministry throughout the world. Through fundraising efforts during the year, CMA members contribute funds that go towards supporting missions and evangelism everywhere. These funds help missionaries, pastors and evangelists by providing transportation, Bibles, as well as the message of salvation in printed/video form in native tongues to use in other countries. The total amount raised from all CMA members/chapters (worldwide) is announced each year on the first weekend in May. This event is called Run for the Son.

To become a member of the Christian Motorcyclists Association a person has to acknowledge that they have accepted Jesus Christ as their personal Savior. There is also a membership training that must be complete. A person does not have to necessarily ride a motorcycle to be a member of CMA. There are many different areas of opportunity to serve within CMA. Mark and I became members of CMA in 2019. Since then, we have been blessed with new friends who share a love for God and ministry as well as a mutual enjoyment of riding motorcycles. I would encourage anyone who might be interested in CMA to please find a local Chapter to get involved with (www.cmausa.org) or contact me at tasha2douglas@gmail.com.

So, again I ask, “What do you ride and who do you ride for?” As for me and Mark, we currently ride a 2012 Harley-Davidson Electra Glide and we are RIDING FOR THE SON.

Tasha Douglas, CMA Member

Chapter #535 Sons of Thunder

Brookhaven