COVID-19 update: Lincoln County reports 177 new cases, 1 more death

Published 6:00 pm Thursday, January 13, 2022

In one day, Lincoln County has reported 177 new positive cases of coronavirus COVID-19 and one new related death.

As of Thursday, Jan. 13, Lincoln has now had 6,404 reported cases and 139 deaths since the onset of the pandemic in early 2020.

Statewide, 8,356 new cases and 17 additional deaths were reported as of 3 p.m. Wednesday afternoon. Each day’s results are posted the following day at msdh.ms.gov, with the exception of weekends, which report Friday-Sunday totals weekly on Mondays.

The Mississippi State Department of Health has recorded 625,328 total cases of COVID-19 ­­— 356,131 confirmed and 269,197 probable. Probable cases are those who test positive by testing methods other than PCR (which detect the presence of ongoing coronavirus infection), such as antibody or antigen, and have recent symptoms consistent with COVID-19.

MSDH has recorded 10,606 related deaths — 7,091 confirmed and 3,515 probable. Probable deaths are those individuals with a designation of COVID-19 as a cause of death on the death certificate, but where no confirmatory testing was performed.

Issaquena County remains the locality with the least cases and deaths from the coronavirus — 200 and seven, respectively, though these numbers have increased recently.

DeSoto County has now reported 40,994 cases and 460 deaths. Harrison has reported 40,700 cases and 572 deaths. Hinds County, the state’s most populous county, has reported 43,895 cases and 665 deaths. The county trailing most closely in both cases and deaths is Jackson, with 29,475 cases and 397 fatalities.

The United States recorded 855,805 new cases and 2,006 new deaths Thursday, raising the nation’s totals to more than 63.397 million cases and 842,873 deaths, according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. Community transmission is rated as “high” for every state in the union.

More than 319.14 million cases of COVID-19 have been reported worldwide, and more than 5.5 million deaths, according to Johns Hopkins University Coronavirus Resource Center.