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Sunshine Breaks Through: Early rain fails to dampen flea market’s crowds

DAILY LEADER / JUSTIN VICORY / Jimmy and Jenie Byrd sell homemade birdhouses at the Wesson Flea Market Saturday. They were among more than 100 vendors at the event.

DAILY LEADER / JUSTIN VICORY / Jimmy and Jenie Byrd sell homemade birdhouses at the Wesson Flea Market Saturday. They were among more than 100 vendors at the event.

There was something for just about everyone at Wesson’s 42nd annual flea market, held all day Saturday. While an early rain threatened to dampen the mood of folks at the market, the sun eventually emerged, leaving visitors and vendors at the market in good spirits.

Residents from Copiah, Lincoln, Lawrence counties and the surrounding area perused more than a hundred separate booths Saturday, as vendors showcased a bevy of talents that included works of art and crafts, as well as homemade recipes and local food items.

Whether the artist’s medium happened to be wood, ceramic, glass or metal, guests Saturday had the opportunity to cherish the individual skills of fellow community members and visitors, who help to ensure skilled talent, labor and pride will never go out of fashion.

Former journalist David “Doc” Trim, displayed close to a hundred model planes, trucks, and cars of all styles and shapes, meticulously carved from wood with fully functioning wheels and propellers at the market.

Billy Crow’s homemade crosses, a cross of custom polished jewels with a wired frame, seemed to be the perfect addition to a dining or living room wall.

As their last name might suggest, Jimmy and Jenie Byrd had a booth at the market, to showcase and potentially sell a series of homemade bird houses in different shapes, such as a church, or with one’s favorite college football team’s insignia on the front, in case your birds are as particular as you are about your favorite team.

Chris Patrick and Vanessa Collins showed off their ceramic coasters, also styled with college football insignias.

Local honey could be found at a number of booths at the market, as could jams, jellies, salsas, dips and even cornbread.

Dewitt Parrett produced homemade ground and sifted cornmeal. Parrett fed corn kernels into a small mill’s mouth, where two slabs of granite grinding against one another smashed the kernels into a fine dusty cornmeal. Whoever purchased a bag of the cornmeal, which came in two sizes, was given Parrett’s recipe for “the best cornbread in the South.”

Some vendors offered packets of herbs and spices, which when combined with a few other ingredients, become the perfect salsa or dip for Saturday or Sunday game days.

Rocky Williamson of Relda’s Sweet Treats sold a collection of jellies, preserves, jalapenos and pickles, a skill and a passion for which he has acquired over the years. Through experimentation, Williamson has developed some particular favorites, strawberry jalapeno pepper jelly and cowboy candy-made from fresh jalapenos, to name a few.

Similar to years’ past, proceeds from the flea market will help provide funds for the Wesson Volunteer Fire Department, which is responsible for setting up the market year after year.